Blood of Abraham: Niggaz And Jewz...Really?

Blood of Abraham: Niggaz And Jewz...Really?

I’ve actually had this conversation before. More than a few times. A whole bunch of people hate black folks. And a whole bunch of people hate Jews. The difference being it’s relatively easy to walk down the street and not have people know you’re a Jew – unless you’re Seinfeld or Mel Brooks or someone. We can disappear into WASP society, and apart from a tossed off “Jew ‘em down” comment, becoming a part of the dominant culture isn’t difficult. That scenario isn’t available for black folks. But the unification of those two minority groups hasn’t really be examined in a large scale, public forum. So, it might be forward thinking for a pair of rappers, who happened to be Jews, to proffer a cooperative situation.

Propped up by Eazy-E’s Relativity Records for its 1993 Future Profits, it seemed that Blood of Abraham was poised to gain some sort of broad audience in the States. With a spate of confrontational material, though, the duo was potentially as good a target for censorship. And with such a niche market in mind, the group’s first, but not only album, didn’t do much in the way of sales, disallowing the group from recording a follow up until 2000. Eazy’s death in 1995 probably didn’t help too much, but seeing as Public Enemy remains a tough sell to a broad audience, these guys didn’t have too much of a chance.

The most problematic song, for some, “Niggaz And Jewz (Some Say Kikes)” is really more shocking as a title and the fact that a pair of Jewish New Yorkers prattle on about race. There definitely more incisive commentaries here and there. And while rap during this era was usually chastised for violent imagery, “Southern Comfort” goes so far as to support shooting rednecks. Of course, according to the group, smoking a bowl before doing so is beneficial. It’s weird, though, that Blood of Abraham finds it so necessary to appropriate black culture, but there’s not radical Judaism. Where was John Zorn when we actually needed him?

Regardless of the top tier production, in 1993 terms, such an untenable political and religious arrangement just wasn’t going to hold. Matisyahu, somehow, has a pretty decent following. But that guy cropped up a bit closer to a time when mounting a digital ad campaign was able to bypass major media outlets who might have been necessary in the past.